review: the merging

The Merging by John P. Logsdon and Christopher P. Young (2017)

What do I say about The Merging, a book I didn’t really enjoy even though I really, really wanted to love it? The Merging held out the prospect of becoming immersed in a series that existed within a fictional world populated by other series with a common thread linking them all together. Fall in love with one series and I wouldn’t be able to stop myself from devouring each series in the same world, right? It would be like NCIS and all its offshoots, or CSI and all its offshoots, or… Well, you get my point. It’s an ambitious vision which I have to commend the authors for undertaking, but at the same time, one of these books was more than enough for me and I’m not inclined to give the other series in this world a try. And yet, the number of four- and five-star ratings this book has received online makes me think I’m an outlier, not the norm, when it comes to not liking this book.

What I need to say, then, is that The Merging is the first book in the Las Vegas Paranormal Police Department series featuring Ian Dex. Logsdon and his co-writers have created series featuring other protagonists who work for the PPD in other cities—Seattle, The Badlands, and New York, just to name a handful. If you’re intrigued enough to want to check out this series or the others in this world of the PPD, then you also want to know that as of this writing, they all appear to be available in the Kindle Unlimited library, but they aren’t currently available through my local library. If you’re on a book budget, well, my honest recommendation is to hold onto your book dollars to be spent elsewhere.

Frequent readers of my blog will notice that I read a lot of first books in the series. Observant readers will have also noticed that I read significantly fewer books that are the second in the series. More often than not, the primary reason that I don’t continue reading a series is because I either don’t like the protagonist or there’s just nothing about him or her that I find compelling. In this series, Logsdon and Young offer Ian Dex as the protagonist and first-person point-of-view narrator. Ian has worked for the PPD for seven years, and for the last five years he’s been the Chief of the Las Vegas PPD. Ian is an amalgamite, which means he has some characteristics of various types of supernaturals, a jack of all trades in the paranormal sense of the term. Upon signing up to be a cop on the PPD force, his DNA has been genetically modified to enhance all of the supernatural qualities he possesses. On the surface, that would seem to make him at least a little interesting, right? I thought so, too, but this potential gets lost in the execution of the story. The authors sacrifice character development for a procedural-type story (and note well that I do not say plot here, which I’ll get to later). While we do learn bits and pieces about Ian as the story moves along, there is a stunning lack of depth to him as a character. He is very much a cardboard character who serves the purposes of the story. I subscribe to the assertion that the protagonist should be someone who is compelling and who I want to follow throughout the story, someone who I just can’t take my eyes off of because I can’t wait to see what happens to him or her next. Frankly, because there’s a lack of depth to Ian’s character, not only did I not find him compelling, I really didn’t care about what he was going to do next because I didn’t really care about him.

Not only is there a lack of depth and development of the protagonist, but the same is also true for the antagonist of the novel as well as the supporting cast. Like Ian, the antagonist is a one-dimensional, almost cartoon character bent on world domination but with absolutely no indication of his motives or why world domination matters to him. He has no real weaknesses to Ian’s and his team’s attempts to stop him until the moment when, magically, they defeat him. I never really had the impression anyone on the team was in mortal peril or any clue as to what would happen should the team fail and the antagonist succeed.  In other words, nothing felt like it was at stake, and again that made it hard for me to care or become invested in the story.

Ah, the story. Yes, there’s a story in The Merging, but there’s really not a plot. Instead, what we are given is a series of challenges Ian and his team have to face as they struggle to understand what exactly they are up against. This made the story feel like the characters were just moving from one scene to another, battling monsters until they could figure out what was going on and then battle the bigger monster, failing again and again until eventually they succeed (and brought the story to conclusion).

While The Merging didn’t end up on my list of abandoned books, I can’t say I enjoyed it or that it was an entertaining read. The concept of the PPD is a good one, I just think the book failed in its execution. With so many other series to try within the urban fantasy genre, this series won’t get a second chance from me.

Have you read The Merging or any of the other series in the world of the Paranormal Police Department? What do you think?

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