review: everdark

Note: Everdark is the second book in Elle Jasper’s paranormal romance series, Dark Ink Chronicles. If you haven’t read the first book in the series, Afterlight, you might want to look away. Spoilers ahead.

Everdark by Elle Jasper (2011)

Like the second season of a decent (but not great) television series, Everdark suffers a sophomore slump. Not only does it take a long time (a really long time) for the book to get going, but just when it seems like the story is gaining some momentum, you realize that not a whole lot is happening. Perhaps worse, what does happen seems to be the same thing that happened before, and before that, and before that. Worst of all, once the moment for the big showdown arrives, it’s completely anti-climactic because, well, there really is no showdown. Then the book ends on a cliffhanger. Everdark was a frustrating read for me, and when it came time for me to give it a rating, it only earned two stars (out of five) from me. If you read my review of Afterlight, you know I wasn’t fully invested in the idea of continuing the series after the end of the first book but that I was willing to give it a try. Now that I have finished the second book (and a lot sooner than I had anticipated) I can’t really say I would recommend the series to readers, especially not when there are so many other great book series out there. This goes double for my readers who are on a book budget. Everdark is not available with a Kindle Unlimited subscription, and it also isn’t available through my local library’s print or ebook collections. So if you want to read it, you have to buy it for either full price at your favorite bookstore or search for it during your next trip to your favorite used bookstore. My suggestion—spend your book dollars elsewhere, and don’t feel any reason to rush into reading book two if you’ve recently finished reading Afterlight. Continue reading

review: turn coat

Note: This is the 11th book in the Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher.  Spoilers will inevitably follow.  If you are new to this series, look away now and go find Storm Front, the first book in the series. You’ll be glad you did!

Turn Coat by Jim Butcher (2009)

If you’ve been around this blog for a while, you know that my opinion of the Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher is that it is the exemplar par excellence urban fantasy series, and so many series follow in its footsteps (and if I may say so, struggle to stand outside its very long shadow). This series is a must-read. Period. It’s been a long, long time since I got lost in a Harry Dresden book. Each time I return (escape?) to Jim Butcher’s version of Chicago and spend some time with Harry and his friends, I wonder why I haven’t already consumed every last available page of this series. Then I remember why I’ve taken my time in getting caught up—as long as we were all still waiting for the 16th book in the series to get published (Peace Talks, which finally has a release date of July 2020), I saw no reason to rush. I also haven’t blown through the remaining books in the series because each one of these books is a lot to take in and digest. They’re not quick reads (especially not for this slow reader) and a lot happens in every book. Plus, I want to savor each one. But with Peace Talks on the horizon (and Battle Ground, the 17th book, scheduled for a late 2020 release!), I’m a bit more motivated to return to this series and finally get caught up. For any readers of this series who stopped somewhere before Turn Coat, or maybe put the series down and haven’t come back to it, you should definitely come back. Turn Coat is one of the books in this series that bears the burden of establishing the foundation for the next major plot arc for the series. Important moments happen in regard to many of Harry’s relationships—with his apprentice, Molly Carpenter, with his mentor, Ebenezer McCoy, with his longtime enemy/antagonist, Morgan, and with his brother, Thomas. There’s even a special moment between Harry and his best friend, Karrin Murphy. (Indeed, after that list, it becomes even more apparent to me why the next book in this series is titled Changes, a notable break in Butcher’s book naming conventions). So, if you’ve been unsure whether or not Turn Coat (or any of the books in the Dresden Files series, for that matter) is worth your book dollars, my opinion is that it definitely is. If your book budget has been stretched a bit thin due to COVID-19, there’s a good chance you’ll be able to find these books in your local library (mine has them!). I’m going to do my best not to spoil the story, but here are a few things you might want to know about Turn Coat before you dive in. Continue reading

review: afterlight

Afterlight by Elle Jasper (2010)

Afterlight is the first book in Elle Jasper’s vampire/paranormal romance series, The Dark Ink Chronicles. Yes, I’m bringing you a vampire romance novel today, so let’s get the preliminaries out of the way, shall we? If you liked the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer, but at the same time prefer your vampire romances to be written for adult readers (as opposed to young adult readers), you will like this first book in the Dark Ink Chronicles. I stumbled upon Afterlight while browsing the shelves of my local used bookstore. It’s been on my bookshelf for at least a year now, but with loads of time on my hands at the moment and nowhere to really go (I read this book during my state’s stay-at-home order prompted by COVID-19), I’ve been searching for new series to dive into and focused on clearing my physical and virtual bookshelves. I decided to finally pick up Afterlight, and the truth is that it kept me up past my bedtime and then kept me entertained for the better part of a Saturday. At the time of this writing, this book isn’t available from my local library or through Kindle Unlimited, but if you find it on your next trip to your local used bookstore and you like vampire romances, it’s worth your book dollars. Continue reading

review: twilight heart

Twilight Heart by Adam J. Wright (2019)

Twilight Heart is the seventh book in Adam J. Wright’s Harbinger P.I. urban fantasy series. If you haven’t read the previous books in this series, I strongly recommend checking out my review of the first book here before reading on. Spoilers are ahead if you’ve not read the previous books. You’ve been warned.

Do you ever make it to the middle of a book series (or a television show for that matter) where you’re invested in the story enough to want to know how it ends, but you’re losing the excitement you had at the very beginning? That’s how I’m starting to feel about the Harbinger P.I. series. I’m going to keep reading because I want to know how it ends, but I just don’t get the same high satisfaction from each new book in the series that the first few books gave me. Here’s my take on book seven, Twilight Heart. Continue reading

review: blood magic

NOTE: The original title of this book was Blood Sacrifice, and the original title for the series was “Sorcerer’s Creed”. Both the book title and the series title have been changed since I originally downloaded a sample of the book in September 2017. I hope this clears away any confusion, as it took me a minute to figure this out.

Blood Magic by N.P. Martin (2016)

Blood Magic is the first book in N.P. Martin’s Wizard’s Creed urban fantasy series. I originally downloaded a sample of this book and for whatever reason decided not to keep reading. Nine months later, I downloaded the book through my Kindle Unlimited subscription. When I started to read it, I had that feeling I’d read it before and sure enough, I had. I kept reading, though, and got to the 40% mark before putting it down and not picking it up again. Last week, I decided to give the book one last try (because right now I’m all about clearing some titles off my kindle) and I made it to the end this time. While I’m not sure if my history with reading Blood Magic is a ringing endorsement, it does suggest that the story concept is appealing enough to me to have picked the book up multiple times. Blood Magic isn’t one of my recommended reads, but for those of you who are fans of the urban fantasy genre, there are a lot of reasons you might want to give the book a try and, depending on your reading preferences, a handful of reasons why you might want to skip this one and keep browsing for your next read. Continue reading

review: modern sorcery

Modern Sorcery by Gary Jonas (2011)

Modern Sorcery is the first book in the Jonathan Shade urban fantasy series by Gary Jonas. This book has been on my kindle for at least six months. I don’t know if this happens to anyone else, but over the weekend I decided I was in the right mood to read this particular book. Well, I should say I was finally in the mood to make a second attempt to read the book. The first time I picked up Modern Sorcery, I read about 9% of the book or what amounts to the first 40 pages. I didn’t know if I would actually make it through the whole book the second time around, but I wanted to, because this is exactly the kind of urban fantasy that is my favorite—private detectives whose investigations take place in a paranormal world, and bonus points if the novel weaves in elements of noir and hardboiled detective fiction. I’m not able to say I loved Modern Sorcery, but I did like it a lot and already plan to read the second book in the series. On a budget? At the time of this writing, it’ll cost you $2.99 plus tax, as the book is not currently available from my local library and it’s also not in the Kindle Unlimited library. If you’re a fan of the urban fantasy genre and looking for a new series, then it’s worth the dollars from your book budget. If you’re a casual fan or new to the genre, I’d recommend starting somewhere else (the Harry Dresden files by Jim Butcher and the Iron Druid Chronicles by Kevin Hearne are fantastic entry points). Continue reading

review: deadline

Deadline by Jennifer Blackstream (2016)

Deadline is the first book in Jennifer Blackstream’s Blood Trails urban fantasy series. If you’re a frequent reader of my blog, then you will have noticed I’ve read a lot of first books in a series lately, and we’re only a few weeks into the year. I tend to think of the first book in a series the same way I think of the pilot episode of a new television show. If the description sparks my curiosity and interest, then I’m willing to sample the first installment. While some critics will tell you we’re experiencing “peak TV”, I would further suggest we’re experiencing “peak publishing”. Which means there are so many more books to sample than I really have time for. The consequence (and maybe it’s a negative consequence) is that the first installment of any series has to grab hold of me and refuse to let me go. What I find is that the more first books I sample, the higher my expectations become, and the harder it is for the book to exceed my expectations. The truth is that my reading time and my book budget dollars are both precious and a finite resource. Which means I’m likely to keep reading a lot of first books in the series, and I’ll try to write something worthwhile and informative about my impressions so that you can decide whether you want to invest your time and money. That being said, let’s dive into the world of Deadline. Continue reading

review: dark magic

Dark Magic by Adam J. Wright (2016)

Dark Magic is the third book in Adam J. Wright’s Harbinger P.I. series. If you haven’t read the first two books in this series, Lost Soul and Buried Memory, I strongly recommend checking out my review of the first book here before reading on. Spoilers are ahead if you’ve not read the first two books. You’ve been warned. Continue reading

review: the merging

The Merging by John P. Logsdon and Christopher P. Young (2017)

What do I say about The Merging, a book I didn’t really enjoy even though I really, really wanted to love it? The Merging held out the prospect of becoming immersed in a series that existed within a fictional world populated by other series with a common thread linking them all together. Fall in love with one series and I wouldn’t be able to stop myself from devouring each series in the same world, right? It would be like NCIS and all its offshoots, or CSI and all its offshoots, or… Well, you get my point. It’s an ambitious vision which I have to commend the authors for undertaking, but at the same time, one of these books was more than enough for me and I’m not inclined to give the other series in this world a try. And yet, the number of four- and five-star ratings this book has received online makes me think I’m an outlier, not the norm, when it comes to not liking this book. Continue reading

review: first grave on the right

First Grave on the Right by Darynda Jones (2011)

First Grave on the Right is the first book in Darynda Jones’ Charley Davidson series. For those of you on a budget, one of the first things you’re going to notice is the price tag on this ebook (and oddly enough, the ebook is a dollar more than the physical paperback version). If you’re like me and haven’t read anything by this author before, you might be a little wary. My monthly book budget is $30 (and that has to also cover my KU subscription), and after tax this book would have taken a third of that amount. That was a big commitment for me for an author whose work I wasn’t sure I was really going to like. But, if you’re a reader on a budget, I’ve got good news for you. First Grave on the Right was available in ebook format from my local library. So if you want to give this book a try but you’re not sure if your book budget can handle it, try your local library. If that fails, you might be able to find a copy in your local used bookstore. Continue reading

review: buried memory

Buried Memory by Adam J. Wright (2016)

I went back for a second helping of Adam J. Wright’s urban fantasy series, Harbinger P.I. and was not disappointed. Buried Memory is certainly an appropriate title that links all of the strands of the story’s plot. It’s about Alec’s buried memories and the physical representation of buried memories—the dead interred in their graves. While I will do my best not to spoil too much, be warned that you need to read this series in order. If you like urban fantasy novels that feature private investigators, give this series a try. The first book in the series is Lost Soul, and you can read my review here. As of this writing, both Lost Soul and Buried Memory are available for Kindle Unlimited subscribers, so if you’re on a budget but have this subscription, you can “read for free”. Continue reading

review: skin and bones

Skin and Bones by Susan Harris (2016)

Skin and Bones is the first book in Susan Harris’ urban fantasy series, The Ever Chace Chronicles. Before you have a chance to read the blurb teasing the story, the first thing appearing in the back cover copy is a pronouncement identifying the book as a “2017 RONE award nominee for best paranormal romance!”. Not going to lie—after I read the description of the story, the suggestion that this book is part of the paranormal romance genre was the gentle push I needed to download the book and give it a try. Do not be fooled like I was—this is not a romance novel. Yes, there is a love plot, but it’s definitely not the A plot. Paranormal suspense is probably a better descriptor of the book’s genre. This is not to say that, once my expectations were adjusted, I didn’t enjoy reading the book. I just didn’t get what I thought I was getting, and while that is sometimes a good thing (like when you get even more than what you were expecting or you get something you didn’t even know you wanted and it was totally awesome), Skin and Bones presented a few other challenges that were difficult for this reader to overcome. Continue reading

review: lost soul

Lost Soul by Adam J. Wright (2016)

Have you ever downloaded a sample of a book, gotten a couple of pages in, and decided to take a pass? Then, months later you give the sample another, dive in, and devour the book? Well, this is what happened to me with Lost Soul by Adam J. Wright. If you’ve seen the book and haven’t decided whether or not you should give it a try, my five cent recommendation is to take a chance and give it a read. If you like urban fantasy featuring a private detective-type main character, or if you are looking for a new series to read, then this book checks a lot of boxes. I’m disappointed this book isn’t available from my local library, but it was certainly worth the withdrawal from this month’s book budget.

The protagonist of Lost Soul is Alec Harbinger, a preternatural investigator banished from Chicago and sent to work in Dearmont, a tiny town in Maine. Alec works for the Society of Shadows, an organization that has its roots in 17th century England. His job is to investigate preternatural threats and solve them. The Society has offices in cities around the world, and though they don’t exactly hide what they do, the majority of the population doesn’t believe in the existence of the supernatural and looks skeptically upon Society investigators. This has the effect of making Alec an outsider, marginalizing him to the fringes of society, and placing him in the long line of protagonists similar to the archetypal hardboiled private eye.

As a character, Alec is fairly ordinary (or at least, that is how he seems right now). He’s not immortal, he doesn’t have any odd idiosyncrasies, he’s not super-flawed or morally grey, he’s not dark and tortured. He’s a likable guy. He’s normal within a world where the paranormal is real. In that way, he’s easy to relate to as a character. What drives him, what he wants most, is to protect unsuspecting people from falling prey to the supernatural creatures walking among them. He wants to do good, and yet he finds himself in opposition to the very Society he works for, which may or may not care about doing what is good and right. Alec resents being stationed in Dearmont and misses Chicago, and as the story begins to unfold, we learn that the reason for his reassignment stems from something that happened while he was in Paris, though it’s a while before the details are revealed (and I won’t spoil them here!). Suffice it to say, this bit of backstory sets up what I expect to become one of the through-lines of the series.

Alec doesn’t expect Dearmont to be a hotbed of supernatural activity, an assumption proven wrong early in the story. How refreshing is it to have a little town in Maine as the primary setting for this series? It’s almost to the point of being a cliche to find urban fantasy series set in New York, Los Angeles, London or even Chicago, and that gets to be imaginatively boring after a while (at least for me it does, and yes, I get that I’m talking about “urban” fantasy). I really appreciate Wright’s decision to set the story in an unconventional location on the map, and I’m hopeful that as the series progresses, the setting will provide a whole gamut of interesting characters and challenges that a big city setting can’t offer. Even though Wright didn’t choose a metropolis for the setting of his story, he is still working in the same tradition of hardboiled detective fiction familiar to readers of the genre, only he takes it down the path that anyone familiar with Stephen King’s work will recognize—a small town that on the outside looks idyllic and wholesome, but underneath the surface lurks the ugly underbelly of humanity.

But of course it’s not just about the protagonist. Overall, it’s a good supporting cast. Each character has potential in his/her own right, but each character also reflects different sides of Alec, showing us who he is and what he cares about. The Society has assigned Felicity Lake to be Alec’s assistant, and while she’s working for him, she can also complete the year of training necessary for her to become a preternatural investigator herself. She’s also there to spy on him for the Society. There’s also Mallory Bronson, who’s been friends with Alec for a few years. Mallory is a “Final Girl” (a term I was not familiar with until reading this book, but then, I don’t watch a lot of horror movies ). As a teenager, she was at a party where everyone was massacred by an assailant called Mister Scary. Now Mallory’s sole mission is to find him and end him, and she puts that mission above everything else in her life. We also meet Leon Smith, a young man Alec encounters as he tries to solve the case his first client in Dearmont brings his way. Leon is new money and good at anything involving computers (yes, he’s your requisite “tech” character). He’s bored and jumps at the chance to help Alec when he needs it. We’ve also got Alec’s absent father, Thomas, who I’m sure will pop up again in future books and seems to be one of the characters with whom Alec will be in conflict as the series continues.

Sheriff John Cantrell also looks to be a conflict character. What is up with the antagonistic law enforcement character that seems to be pervading every urban fantasy series I pick up? I am seeing that trope with greater prevalence these days and I’m bored with it. And yet I understand why this character keeps reappearing. One, it’s a way of adding conflict to the story and another kind of antagonist for the protagonist to have to deal with. This character generally ups the stakes for the protagonist and puts him/her into some sort of peril. Two, it follows in the hardboiled tradition of law enforcement being corrupt and underscores the need for the protagonist to continue doing his job and in doing so, protect the community, sometimes using any means necessary. So while I’m not a fan of this kind of character, I understand the reason for his/her existence, and in this series we’ve got Sheriff John Cantrell.

The more time I spend writing this review, the more I realize how much I liked this book. It marries two of my favorite genres—urban fantasy and hardboiled detective fiction. I definitely recommend reading Lost Soul, especially if you’re like me and have trouble finding new urban fantasy series you can enjoy and don’t feel the same as everything else in the genre.

Have you read Lost Soul? What did you think?

review: maggie get your gun

Maggie Get Your Gun by Kate Danley (2011)

This is the second book in Kate Danley’s Maggie MacKay Magical Tracker series. If you haven’t read the first book, Maggie for Hire, click here for a review and keep reading at your own risk. Spoilers ahead!  Did you want to know if you should still keep reading this series if you’ve only sampled the first book? Yes, you should.  Danley has written another fun and fast-paced adventure with a strong lead and supporting cast.

Maggie Get Your Gun picks up about two weeks after the end of Maggie for Hire.  Life has gotten back to what relatively passes for normal for Maggie—she’s still working as a magical tracker for hire, and she’s now back to doing it in partnership with her father.  Except, at the beginning of the story, Maggie’s father is out of the office on a long weekend getaway trip with Maggie’s mother.  Left alone to hold down the fort, Maggie decides to take on the case brought to her by a new client, Isaac Smith, who tells her that he knows her father.  Smith wants to hire Maggie to retrieve a lady’s hair comb that he left behind on Earth in a place near Las Vegas called Calico Ghost Town.  Maggie senses that Smith isn’t telling her the full story, but when Smith offers to pay her a hefty sum to locate the comb and bring it back to the Other Side, she agrees to the take the case.  With her father out of town and not answering his phone, Maggie decides to enlist Killian, the elf, as backup.  The pair travels to Calico Ghost Town and once they retrieve the hair comb, they discover that it does have magical properties—namely, rising the dead from their graves and turning them into mummies.  Once Maggie realizes that she has been effectively hired to smuggle the comb across the border between worlds (a crime that world walkers like Maggie often become entangled in and for which she could lose her license to move between worlds) she decides to confront Smith and force him to reveal his true reasons for wanting the comb.

I am still very much a fan of Maggie as a character.  She is smart, strong, and funny.  One of the things we learn about Maggie in this book is that she’s always been afraid of ghosts, a fear she’ll have to overcome in order to defeat the primary antagonist of the story.  We also learn that she worries about falling into the trap of becoming a smuggler, which is portrayed as being the common fate and downfall of many world walkers. These are a couple of the insights we get into her character during this adventure.  Not many, and there is not a significant amount of development or growth for her character, but there is enough to keep her interesting and me wanting to continue to follow her through more investigations.

Like in Maggie for Hire, the supporting cast adds depth to the story and is one of the series’ strengths.  Maggie’s twin sister, Mindy, returns, as do her mother and father, Killian, Pipistrelle (the brownie who now protects Mindy and doubles as her housekeeper), and Xiaoming.  Though Maggie herself doesn’t show a lot of change in this story, there is development in her relationships with the supporting characters.  By the end of the story, her relationships with her father and Killian change, and Mindy has also demonstrated that she’s a little bit different than she was before.  In Maggie Get Your Gun, what you have is a family that fights together to save the world, helped along by some friends they make along the way.  If you are a fan of Supernatural and like the family dynamic of that show (Sam and Dean, along with their chosen family—Bobby, Castiel, Jo and Ellen, Jodie) then I think you will like this book because it has that sort of feel to it (I also think that if you’re a fan of Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, you’ll also like this series).  In addition to Maggie’s friends and family, the Big Bad of the series so far—Vaclav, the vampire that wants Maggie dead—also makes a return in this book.  For this reason, I recommend that the books definitely be read in order for maximum enjoyment.  This isn’t the kind of series where you can skip around or skip books and not be confused about what’s going on.

I enjoyed this book and will continue to read more of this series.  Maggie’s first-person narrative style is engaging and holds my interest and attention, and yet another strength of the narrative style is that unlike so many first-person stories I have sampled lately, there isn’t endless narration with no real conversation or interaction with the other characters in the story.  We’re not just alone in Maggie’s head while she tells us what happened and what everyone else did.  Maggie is telling the story, but the supporting characters are right there with her, acting and reacting.  And for my friends with a book budget—this one wasn’t available from my library but it was worth every dollar.  If you haven’t tried this series, you should, and if you read the first book, keep reading! I definitely will.

Have you read Maggie Get Your Gun or any other books by Kate Danley? What did you think?

review: the grendel affair

The Grendel Affair by Lisa Shearin (2013)

Have you seen The Librarians or Bones? The Grendel Affair feels a lot like those shows, but with supernatural elements. This is the first book in Shearin’s SPI Files series and it could easily be viewed as a kind of pilot episode for the series itself. We are introduced to the main characters that will make up the crime-solving team whose purpose is to protect humanity from the supernatural baddies stalking the underbelly of the world. Like you would expect, we don’t get to know to know too much about any one character, but by the end of the story, there’s the expectation that as this series unfolds, more will be revealed about each member of the team and the supporting cast. But as with any pilot episode—and more to the point, any first book in a series—the characters have to grab you, drag you into their world, and make you want to stay there with them. I’m not convinced that this particular Scooby gang succeeds.

Let’s start with the main protagonist. The story is told through the first-person point of view of Makenna “Mac” Fraser. Mac is relatively new to SPI (Supernatural Protections & Investigations) and the talent that makes her unique as well as placing a perpetual target on her back is her ability to see beneath the glamours, veils and disguises that supernaturals are able to draw over their features and make themselves appear to be human. This ability makes Mac a Seer, a rarity in the world Shearin is building and as such a highly valuable asset to the SPI team. Given that she’s still new to the team, though, Mac is still learning how to navigate the ins and outs of her new job, and though her talent isn’t new, putting it to use is. She’s not an uninitiated innocent that doesn’t know about the hidden world of the supernatural, but she is at a starting point in the series where she has a lot to learn and tons of room for character development and growth. The problem with Mac, at least in this first book, is that she’s not compelling enough. Yes, she has her struggles in terms of fitting into this new world of SPI, but other than the fact that she’s a Seer and the promise that this will likely put her life in danger again and again, there weren’t any glimpses or teases that there’s anything interesting lurking in her backstory. Mac is normal. Maybe too normal.

Which brings me to the supporting cast. Mac’s partner is Ian Byrne, formerly an NYPD detective. She’s not really sure if Ian really likes her or sees her as an equal member of the team, and worries that he thinks of her as someone to babysit. From early on in the novel, there’s a bit of mystery surrounding Ian, as Mac runs into someone she doesn’t know but who clearly knows her and asks her to send his regards to her partner, whom she identifies by name. Then near the middle of the book, Ian relates the event from his past that caused him to leave the NYPD and start working for SPI, adding another layer of interest to his character. Ian doesn’t have any supernatural talents, but he knows how to strategize and soldier. He’s a protector (and yes, maybe that’s why I’m so drawn in by him as a character) but he’s also clearly not a plain vanilla character. Another key member of the supporting cast is Vivienne Sagadraco, the founder of SPI and director of the New York office. Like her name is intended to suggest, Sagadraco is a dragon (cue references to the “dragon lady”) and as the plot develops, it becomes clear that she, too, has a compelling backstory that will come back to haunt her present and impact the team as a whole. It’s also clear that Sagadraco could become the mentor-type figure for Mac, supportive but authoritative, cautious but encouraging. Then there’s Sagadraco’s right-hand man, Alain Moreau, a vampire who is also the lead counsel for SPI (cue references to the “blood-sucking” lawyer). He doesn’t have a big role in the story, but when he does appear it’s with the sense that at some point in this series, he will be featured more prominently and that Moreau is definitely much much more than he seems. Rounding out the cast are Yasha, a werewolf; Calvin, a human who agent who is good in battle; and Kenji, the computer/tech wizard. The problem that Ian and Sagadraco pose is that they are far more interesting than Mac, the perceived protagonist. I can imagine myself picking up the second book in this series just to see how the characters develop, but at the same time it’s not a book I’m going to rush to download or add to my to be read list.

Shearin has chosen New York City as the setting for her series, and no offense to the New Yorkers out there, but once again I find myself rolling my eyes and shaking my head at this choice. Though popular culture wants me to believe it, NYC really isn’t the only city in the world. At the same time, I do have to admit that the choice of New York City is a good one for this particular story. In order to “save the day” Mac and Ian must stop the antagonist of the story from revealing the existence of the supernatural community before the ball drops in Times Square on New Year’s Eve. Aside from the setting, there isn’t a great deal of world-building in the first book in this series, but again, I’m willing to chalk that up to this being the equivalent of the pilot episode of a new series. The point here is that thus far, there’s nothing unique or new about the world Shearin presents, which means you’ll feel at home if you’re a frequent reader of urban fantasy but that there’s also the potential for being bored. For new readers of the genre, it is a good entry point that isn’t so complex that you’ll be put off or alienated.

Is The Grendel Affair a satisfying read? Yes, but I’m not sure I would take the next step and say that it was hard for me to put down or that I was fully engaged throughout the story. It was average, not by any means the worst of the category but not an exemplar, either. Considering that I’ve always got my eye on my book budget and want to make the most of my book dollars, I’m not inclined to read the next book in this series any time soon. If you’re looking for urban fantasy that is similar to what you’d find in the cozy mystery genre, this one might be for you; however, if like your urban fantasy to be populated by characters with haunting backstories and a world that is a bit more dangerous and threatening, then take a pass on this one.

Have you read The Grendel Affair or any other books by Lisa Shearin? What did you think?