review: turn coat

Note: This is the 11th book in the Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher.  Spoilers will inevitably follow.  If you are new to this series, look away now and go find Storm Front, the first book in the series. You’ll be glad you did!

Turn Coat by Jim Butcher (2009)

If you’ve been around this blog for a while, you know that my opinion of the Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher is that it is the exemplar par excellence urban fantasy series, and so many series follow in its footsteps (and if I may say so, struggle to stand outside its very long shadow). This series is a must-read. Period. It’s been a long, long time since I got lost in a Harry Dresden book. Each time I return (escape?) to Jim Butcher’s version of Chicago and spend some time with Harry and his friends, I wonder why I haven’t already consumed every last available page of this series. Then I remember why I’ve taken my time in getting caught up—as long as we were all still waiting for the 16th book in the series to get published (Peace Talks, which finally has a release date of July 2020), I saw no reason to rush. I also haven’t blown through the remaining books in the series because each one of these books is a lot to take in and digest. They’re not quick reads (especially not for this slow reader) and a lot happens in every book. Plus, I want to savor each one. But with Peace Talks on the horizon (and Battle Ground, the 17th book, scheduled for a late 2020 release!), I’m a bit more motivated to return to this series and finally get caught up. For any readers of this series who stopped somewhere before Turn Coat, or maybe put the series down and haven’t come back to it, you should definitely come back. Turn Coat is one of the books in this series that bears the burden of establishing the foundation for the next major plot arc for the series. Important moments happen in regard to many of Harry’s relationships—with his apprentice, Molly Carpenter, with his mentor, Ebenezer McCoy, with his longtime enemy/antagonist, Morgan, and with his brother, Thomas. There’s even a special moment between Harry and his best friend, Karrin Murphy. (Indeed, after that list, it becomes even more apparent to me why the next book in this series is titled Changes, a notable break in Butcher’s book naming conventions). So, if you’ve been unsure whether or not Turn Coat (or any of the books in the Dresden Files series, for that matter) is worth your book dollars, my opinion is that it definitely is. If your book budget has been stretched a bit thin due to COVID-19, there’s a good chance you’ll be able to find these books in your local library (mine has them!). I’m going to do my best not to spoil the story, but here are a few things you might want to know about Turn Coat before you dive in. Continue reading